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What is Gelatin bloom strength?

The term bloom with regard to gelatin can be a little confusing because it may be used in two different contexts. One refers to the process of softening the gelatin in liquid prior to melting it. Recipes will often instruct you to bloom the gelatin in cold water for 5-10 minutes, which means to soak it. You can bloom gelatin in just about any liquid. But you should avoid the fresh tropical fruit juices, such as papaya, kiwi, mango, and pineapple as they contain an enzyme (bromelin) that will break down the gelatin. However, pasteurizing kills the enzymes in these fruits, so canned or frozen juices are fine. The other use of Bloom refers to the firmness of gelatin. A Bloom Gelometer, named after inventor Oscar T. Bloom, is used in a controlled process to measure the rigidity of a gelatin film. The measurement is called the Bloom Strength. A higher number indicates a stiffer product. Gelatin used in food usually runs from 125 Bloom to 250 Bloom. There are several different grades of sheet gelatin. The most popular are Silver grade (160 Bloom) and Gold grade (190220 Bloom). Typically the higher the Bloom, the more you can expect to pay.